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4 Ways I’m Not as Healthy as You Think I Am and Why I Am OK with That

“Oh! Well then I shouldn’t tell you what I had for dinner last night!”

Is a response I often get when people find out what I do for a living, and it always makes me a tiny bit sad and just a smidge self-conscious. Why? Because it shows that some people worry that I am going to judge them for their food choices. It betrays the shame people feel about what they are eating. It is yet another reminder that, in our culture, food and morality sometimes go hand-in-hand.

More and more, the message seems to be: if you aren’t eating “healthy,” then there is something wrong with you—if you eat sugar-laden treats, drink soda, have chips, buy fast food, or depend on processed foods, you are poisoning yourself and anyone else you might be feeding.

But over the years that I have worked in this “healthy” food world, I have grown to believe more and more that this sort of thinking about food and eating is more damaging than eating any of those “bad” foods.

When I first started trying to change my own diet to a healthier one, I was completely overwhelmed by all of the messages I was getting: don’t eat wheat; sugar is poison; don’t eat dairy; only eat organic; include x, y, and z superfoods in your daily diet; drink one glass of red wine a day; never drink wine; drink one cup of coffee a day; coffee will destroy your adrenal gland and you’ll never have energy again, etc.

It got to a point where I would go food shopping and feel paralyzed, even in a health food store!

And then I realized it was too much. I was reverting back to my days of disordered eating. I had lost touch with why I had gone into this work in the first place—because I wanted to share my passion for food and show people how accessible and life changing simple cooking can truly be.

So I made a conscious decision to let go. Yes, I was going to continue to find fun ways to make my diet healthier. Yes, I planned to include more fruits and vegetables and cook mostly from whole ingredients. But I was not going to deprive myself (or my family) of foods that we truly enjoy or feel guilty about any of the foods we ate. In other words, I found a balance.

4 ways I’m not as healthy as you think

Here are some things about my eating that may surprise you:

candy bowl

1. I eat sugar.

Not a lot of it, but there is sugar somewhere in my diet every day. There is some in my chai, I often have a handful of chocolate chips after lunch, and I often enjoy something sweet after dinner.

 

2. I drink alcohol.

I usually have a glass of wine in the evening. Sometimes two. And when I go out for a grown up night, maybe even more (although this is less and less true as I feel crummier the next morning than I used to, so it has become less “worth it”).

 

Farmer’s Market Pasta with Sweet Corn and Tomatoes

3. There are refined carbs in my house.

White pasta? Yup. White rice? Yes. White flour? You bet. Do I also have the whole grain versions of all of those things? Absolutely. But we enjoy both in our house. After all, I am married to a Brazilian who might divorce me if all the white rice disappeared from our dinner table.

 

Trail Mix4. There are processed snacks in my house.

No, I don’t have Doritos or Cheetos laying around (although we do enjoy those on occasion and I don’t judge anyone who has them on the regular!), but there are often pretzels, corn chips, or potato chips. I also often make stove top popcorn, bake whole grain muffins, and have been known to make crackers from scratch.

What have I learned from all of this? For me, the greatest realization was that once I stopped feeding myself from a place of rules and restriction, I started enjoying my food more. I savored it more. I was more relaxed about it.

And the coolest realization of all: now that I’m not feeling deprived anymore, the foods that I naturally choose (most of the time, at least) are the healthier options because they actually make me feel better and because I am more attuned to what my body and my heart need.

So, please, next time you talk to me, tell me all about the McDonalds or the microwave pizza you ate and also share with me the recipe for the amazing vegetable soup you made from scratch. I want to hear it all and honor it all, because that is what food should be about.

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